To Whom My Vote Gone

By: Ali Hassan

As election days coming close, people from different political parties are seen engaged to work for greater gathering for their respective leaders. After more than four unseen ministers once again they are seem roaming in different street within their respective constituency. People are also relishing to see new branded cars.

Though democracy runs by voters but here in rural areas of Balochistan it entirely depends on contester spending on so called political campaign. In democracy election contester generally goes to the voters to aware them about their political ideology. Subsequently voters ideologically link themselves with one of the best available options. Such ideological connection will help political parties to revive voter at any critical time.

But here in Balochistan rural areas scenario absolutely altered. Political leaderships definitely visit their constituency; however, they do not meet with voters. They search for influential figurehead within constituency so he can work on his behaves to attract more and more voters. If the political leader wins the election so influential figurehead will be granted privileges from their so-called leadership. Due to lack of education in such system people from the grassroots cast the vote but do not know to whom it goes.

Therefore the elected parliamentarians and ministers don’t bother to work on infrastructure and development of their constituency. So those fake symbolic leaders provide more and more privileges to feudal lords, businessmen, religious person who worked for his success for securing seat in provincial or national assembly.

In addition to that those influential people neither capable to do development work nor force their so called leader to take initiatives. Thus people of the said constituency suffers for next five years.

Hence it is necessary for the people to know about democratic process and to whom their votes are going. Otherwise people from the rural areas keep suffering.

Published in The Balochistan Point on October 18, 2017


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